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  1. #1
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    Value of fox sterlingworth double barrel shotgun

    I have a fox sterlingworth shotgun;trying to find out the value of it for a relative. The serial #119645 is stamped on all of the parts, even the trigger guard. It was manufactured by A.H. fox co. in phila, pa. Its a 12 gauge standard grade (I think) , looks to be a good shape except for the stock which is scratched; the barrel has "fluid compressed steel" stamped on it. I'm sure I'll have to take it somewhere to get an accurate price, but just wondering what the normal range of value is. There are several patent numbers from 1905 to 1924 stamped on the receiver.

    Thanks,

    Don

  2. #2
    Eagle
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    Quote Originally Posted by doncic View Post
    I have a fox sterlingworth shotgun;trying to find out the value of it for a relative. The serial #119645 is stamped on all of the parts, even the trigger guard. It was manufactured by A.H. fox co. in phila, pa. Its a 12 gauge standard grade (I think) , looks to be a good shape except for the stock which is scratched; the barrel has "fluid compressed steel" stamped on it. I'm sure I'll have to take it somewhere to get an accurate price, but just wondering what the normal range of value is. There are several patent numbers from 1905 to 1924 stamped on the receiver.

    Thanks,

    Don
    According to a list I have, your gun was made in 1928. Its very hard to predict what it might be worth. I would go to gunbroker.com and look up Fox Sterlingworths. They usually have any number up for bids and you can look for one similar to yours to get an idea of what they are going for. Don't worry about early bid prices. The auctions usually close up in the last hour or so.
    Some places remain unknown because no one has ever gone there. Others remain so because no one has ever come back.

  3. #3
    Eagle
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    We need to see several good pictures of the gun to evaluate condition and any extra cost options. I have a Sterlingworth less than 200 lower serial numbers and it letters as being shipped July 20, 1928, top gun in this picture --



    Lower gun is 1936.

    The A.H. Fox Gun Co. Sterlingworth was offered in four barrel lengths, known in the period literature by names -- 26-inch (Brush), 28-inch (Field), 30-inch (Standard) and 32-inch (Trap). The 30-inch Sterlingworth Standard was far and away the most common, and hence draws the least money in the marketplace today, condition and options being the same. The basic Sterlingworth came with double triggers, plain extractors, a single metal bead front sight, and a buttplate. Extra cost options available on the Sterlingworth in the 1928 era were automatic ejectors, a Fox-Kautzky Single Selective Trigger, twin ivory sights and a Jostam Anti-Flinch Recoil pad. So, value depends on condition, barrel length, condition, options or lack of, condition, originality, and condition.

  4. #4
    Eagle
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    Jan 2008
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    I have traded in AH Fox guns over the past 30+ years. The current market is depressed due to the current economy.
    The prices for the 12ga Sterlingworths are at an all time low (same can be said for Parkers etc.). The last 12ga Sterlingworth I purchased (6 months ago) inexcellent condition with #4 weight barrels, 28" M/F was a mere $650.

    If you like the gun I suggest you enjoy it and realize you are shooting one of america's best....it however will never be worth a lot of money.

    The current interest level in old SXS shotguns is low and going lower everyday. Today's youth has little interest in old-time SXS guns...they are looking for sleek autoloaders and racy O/U shotguns. Fact is the sale of hunting licenses have been on the decline for the past decade....it all adds up to shotguns being a very bad investment item.

    The good news is if you love these historic shotguns and are not buying to resell for profit, now is the time to add to your collection at bargain prices. You will incounter many dealers who still think these guns are worth big bucks.
    Attend gun shows and shop the internet to find realistic prices in tune to this very flat economy.

    Happy hunting!!
    Last edited by 28 Gauge; June 10th, 2012 at 11:51 AM.

  5. #5
    Eagle
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    Interesting comment about the barrel weights on the AH Fox guns- A friend, a retired Circuit Court Judge, has three AH Fox guns, but only one has a barrel weight number stamped on each barrel flat- his 12 gauge Sterlingworth with 30" Fluid Compressed Steel barrels has the number 2 barrels- this gun was made in Philadelphia in about 1926, it has double triggers and selective ejectors-- He also has an earlier graded Phila Fox- a BE 12 with 29 and 1/2" (actual measurement) Krupp Flusstahl barrels, DT and Ejectors- no barrel weight stamp evident- and he also has a Utica Savage-Fox Sterlingworth 16 gauge with DT and ejectors, and again, no barrel weight stamps-

    There were four numerical stamps- 1, 2,3, and finally 4, I am informed. How did these numbers correspond to barrel weights??
    In times of grave danger, you may walk with the devil until you have crossed the bridge!

  6. #6
    Eagle
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    Mr. Plummer, in response to your question above, Fox barrels were stamped by standard unstruck weight, #1 being the heaviest and #4 being the lightest. You'll rarely find the #4 stamp because the numbers were usually struck off the lighter barrels in preparation for their use...SelbyLowndes

  7. #7
    Eagle
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    Thank you very much for that data.
    In times of grave danger, you may walk with the devil until you have crossed the bridge!

  8. #8
    Eagle
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    western NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by doncic View Post
    ... I'll have to take it somewhere to get an accurate price, but just wondering what the normal range of value is.
    Don
    $600-900 for 26-30" barrels. Comparable condition and 32" barrels may bring $900-1200.

  9. #9
    Eagle
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    I just picked up a 16 ga. Fox Sterlingworth at Cabela's for $850. I really wanted a set of 30" barrels, but would have had to pay around $2,000 for one of those, so got a 28" barreled plane jane, Utica, Savage-Fox made from all Philidelphia parts. The opening lever was right in the center, but very nice old gun, tight with great barrels. Like all Foxes a joy to open, close and go shoot. I sold off five or six guns to justify putting this one in the gun safe. Now have a total of 5 Fox Guns, 2-12s, a 16, a 20 and a CSMC 28 ga. and 3 Grulla's.

    Barrels are not marked on the Fox 16 ga. but gun is light at 6.2 lbs after I added a Remington soft butt pad to get the lop out to 15 1/8", and converted the lines to a straight gripped gun. Handles just so nicely. Can't wait for hunting season. Doves first of September.
    justice is random, but my heros have always been old war marines and smokejumpers.

  10. #10
    Eagle
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    Fox barrel weight stamps were quite often removed during the gun fitting process (the weights were stamped in the white). Michael McIntosh's book on the history of Fox guns has several pages of barrel weights as related to the number system, gauge and barrel length. If you intend to collect Fox guns this book should be on your book shelf!

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