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  1. #1
    Eagle
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    Taking guns to Canada

    As all Canadians know, the gun laws were changed in April, 2012. This affects Americans going to Canada, also.
    Your crossing can be made easier by obtaining a PAL (possession and acquisition license) and I am in the process of doing so. It's a bit of work but will be well worth it for someone like me who hunts frequently and occasionally shoots up north.
    Here's what you need to know. There are two ways of getting guns into Canada: (1.) Non-Resident Firearm Declaration and, (2.) Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL) .
    I mailed my application in today and, hopefully, will have it in time for my upcoming hunting trip.

  2. #2
    Eagle
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    Thanks Tom ! Good information.

  3. #3
    Eagle
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    Aug 2007
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    Southern Georgia, USA
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    Tom, I am a little confused by your post. Are you saying that if I already have a PAL I do not need to complete the Non-Resident Firearm Declaration when I visit Saskatchewan in October? I think I remember that that was the way it was prior to the long-gun registration experiment...SelbyLowndes

  4. #4
    Eagle
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    If you have a PAL, you no longer have to register guns at the border. Just present your card to customs and declare your guns. Non-restricted gun registration was abolished in Canada. However, if you DO NOT have a PAL card, you have to fill out the Non-resident Firearms Registration Declaration form and pay a $25 fee.
    I have taken (challenged) and passed the Canadian Firearms Safety Course which is required and submitted my PAL application. The process will take another month.
    Here's the RCMP info on bringing guns into Canada:
    http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/cfp-pcaf/f...visite-eng.htm

  5. #5
    Eagle
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    Thanks for the clarification Tom. I obtained my PAL long enough ago that I'm on my 1st renewal which will expire in 2013...SelbyLowndes

  6. #6
    Eagle
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    Colorado
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    I got my PAL card in about 2000. Took a course and a test! The first time I went to Canada and showed my PAL card, I was almost strip searched. The customs officer said " I've never seen a non Canadian with one of these cards". It was not a good experience. I decided not to renew it and got a letter from Canada saying I had to TURN IN my guns that were registered in Canada. I renewed it in case I ever went back to Canada.
    Make sure your guns are registered with US Customs before going.

  7. #7
    Eagle
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    I've talked to the RCMP regarding possible border "problems". If you have difficulty with Customs, have them contact the RCMP. It might help to print the new regs that I have provided and bring them with you.
    The PAL card is both time and cost effective. It costs $60 and is good for 5 years. The Non-resident Firearms Declaration is good for 2 months and costs $25.
    As mentioned, getting the PAL requires taking the Canadian Firearms course and/or challenging the written exam and practical test. After passing the tests, there is a several week delay in receiving the results which you need when applying. There is a minimum 28-day waiting period for the PAL itself.

  8. #8
    Eagle
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Duk View Post
    Make sure your guns are registered with US Customs before going.
    You know, that US Customs registration is not really a requirement of our government. The US Customs website plainly states that the form provided by their office is only one method of proving prior ownership when returning to the USA from a trip outside the Country. A copy of a bill of sale or sales reciept is specifically cited as being sufficient. An ornery customs agent might have to be shown the information from his own website, but that's the rule.


    Other Countries seem to place much more importance on the customs form than our own government does. Probably best to go by the customs office at your airport and get the form, like Duk says.


    My problem is we have no customs office at my home airport and the nearest one is in the port city of Brunswick, GA. That's too far to go to get the form verified. What I've been doing is print out the form from the Customs website and fill it out with my gun information. I then have it signed by our local Postmaster and stamped with his postal stamp. I have heard but have never been able to verify that there is a regulation somewhere in the CFR to the effect that a Postmaster has authority to do this as an ex-officio customs officer. Does anyone have a reference to this regulation (if it even exists)???


    As a practical matter, I've never had a US Customs officer or any of the officials in any foreign Country challenge my Postmaster verified form. I don't even understand why foreign officials even ask to see it; the form serves no purpose anywhere except as a convenient method of proof that you don't owe any customs duty on the item when returning home...SelbyLowndes

  9. #9
    Eagle
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    I've been checked by a U.S. Customs agent 3 times in almost 40 years of taking guns to Canada. I have a book full of forms that I keep with me on all trips but never had to use them until recently. The irony is that it's been the same customs officer who's asked for proof. I didn't remember him until after we pulled away the second time. When he did it last year, I recognized him right away and new it was coming.
    Anyway, it takes 5 minutes to get the U.S. form filled out with guns verified and I always register any new guns prior to trip day. It means one less stop.
    Have proof of some sort. You don't need problems at the end of a long day in the car, especially border trouble.
    Last edited by Tom28ga; September 13th, 2012 at 02:25 AM.

  10. #10
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    Kootenays - British Columbia
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    What I liked about our (Canadian) long gun registry was that it proved ownership and made it no hassle to bring your guns back into Canada from the USA. Now we have to go back to the old 'proof' method for any guns acquired after the change.

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