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  1. #1
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    When You pass thru Cody, stop and see the Lady & Her Elsie's

    Gentlemen,
    If you get the chance to travel to Cody Wyoming, take time to visit the Cody Museum and make sure you take time to see Annie and her Elsie's. A part of American shooting history on display for all to see.
    RGD/Dave


    Never worry about what others believe, walk in the way of the Lord.

  2. #2
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    very nice, RGD-- just curious, as my Lady's inherited 16 Pigeon Grade, made in 1911- also has the same straight hand grip as the vertically placed Smith on her right-- my eyes discern a ventilated black recoil pad on the butt, and a gold oval on the lower section of the buttstock. Is there any engraving on that oval shield/ Also, the black buttplate looks to be a ventilated design, perhaps akin to a Pachmyer pad-- This is your impression as well? A Side view of the locks would tell us if this graded Smith is a pre-1913 era gun, which is my guess, or perhaps a later 1914 to 1029 era Smith, as witnessed by the circular "banjo" style forearm escutcheon.
    In times of grave danger, you may walk with the devil until you have crossed the bridge!

  3. #3
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    Joseph,
    Most all of Annie's Elsies are pre 13 guns, however the single BBl trap gun pictured maybe from the early 20's era.
    Some of the guns were gifts to Annie from John Hunter Sr and others were purchased by Frank Butler, Annie's husband who was also a trick shooter. The most famous is Butlers gift to her with her likness engraved on both side locks.
    I can not remember if her innitials are on the oval of the gun you are asking about, I believe they are, but I can not remember. My buddy Harold just returned from the Wyoming, I will ask him, he saw the display last week.
    Joseph any time your lady wants to sell her 16 Gauge Pigeon Grade Elsie, I would be proud to add it to my collection.
    RGD/Dave
    Never worry about what others believe, walk in the way of the Lord.

  4. #4
    Any time spent at the Cody museum is time well spent. I took my sister there this past summer when she came for a visit. It has something for nearly every interest. I did look at Annie Oakley's guns. I thought of Dave when seeing what they were.

    I think I most enjoyed the western art, especially Charlie Russell's work. He captured the essence of Montana better than any artist I've ever seen. They also have the Chadwick ram on display. It is the largest Stone's sheep ever taken. It is an absolutely stunning animal.

    Any trip to the Cody area should include the museum.

  5. #5
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    Dave Noell,
    Thank you sir very much and I do agree with you about Charlie Russell's work, his work IS Montana, no doubt about it.
    One of the items I like best on dispaly in the museum is the Cody Saddle, each & every silver dollar with the center shot out, and tied on that Saddle, was shot out when thrown in the air, buy Bill Cody himself. When a man thinks he is good with a gun, he just needs to take a close look at that saddle, and Bill Cody said Annie was a better marksman than he ever was. One thing however Annie never was awarded the CMH, Bill Cody has one. Many eastern people
    thought Bill was a braggard, when he was simply stating actual fact, his treeing of a bar in Williamsport, Pa after his friend Billy Hickock was insulted, is not just Pa legend, it is hard cold fact, that after taking Hickock back to his hotel, because Hickock had a piece bond placed on him, that Cody returned to the bar took off his Colts, placed them on the Bar and fought all 6 lumber jacks, almost completely distroying the inside of the bar, which he then payed for, picked up his colts and left. Bill Cody was the real deal, the Museum is a fitting tribute to a man with few equals. Annie was not just his employee, she was a very close friend, and after her terrible car accident, Bill Cody's money supported her and Frank. When Annie passed away Frank Butler refused to eat and 18 days later passed away himself. Annie was abused after her real father and mother passed away, she and Frank had no children because of the abuse she suffered as a child.

    Annie's wish for all ladies was that they would all learn to use a gun as will as they learned to take care of their babies. Annie passed away and was burried in Greenville, OH, her wish for her own baby, never came true.

    What most people do not know is that the Rough Riders were named for Annie Oakley the leader of Bill Codys Rough Riders of the world, Annie had 500 expert marksladies who worked for her, she offered their service to President Teddy R to support his War effort. Teddy named his Rough Riders after Annies Rough Riders of the World in Cody's Wild West Show. He would not let the ladies risk their lives for his war efforts however.

    At the US Army War College we were taught about many of the CMH awards.
    Nobody but Audie Murphy, was a braver soldier than Chief of Scouts William F. Cody, that takes in a lot of American Military history.
    Last edited by Ryman Gun Dog; November 10th, 2013 at 12:23 PM.
    Never worry about what others believe, walk in the way of the Lord.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Noell View Post
    I think I most enjoyed the western art, especially Charlie Russell's work. He captured the essence of Montana better than any artist I've ever seen.
    Thanks for this post. I will make a trip to Cody and to this museum a priority. But I wanted to give a shout out to the Charlie Russell museum in Great Falls. If you like his art that museum is a must see!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Redtrail View Post
    Thanks for this post. I will make a trip to Cody and to this museum a priority. But I wanted to give a shout out to the Charlie Russell museum in Great Falls. If you like his art that museum is a must see!
    Amen.

    Also Montana's Historical Museum in Helena has my favorite Charlie Russell painting. "When the Land Belonged to God"

  8. #8
    Somewhere in S D on I -80 I believe is another museum I always wanted to stop but always in a big hurry to do so. Any idea what it's called.?

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by gspdog View Post
    Somewhere in S D on I -80 I believe is another museum I always wanted to stop but always in a big hurry to do so. Any idea what it's called.?
    It would be I-90 if it is in South Dakota. Also I-29.

    If Terry Redlin appeals to you, the Redlin Center in Watertown off I-29 has most of his originals displayed. There are several points of interest going across on I-90 but I've never stopped at most of them. I've done Wall Drug, a Plain's Indian museum in Chamberlain and the South Dakota Hall of Fame also in Chamberlain.

  10. #10
    Eagle Crazy Horse 7/3's Avatar
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    I visited the Cody museum way back in 1977. Being a member of the 7th Cavalry I found something very interesting at the museum. They had a display case of a neckless made of the trigger finger tip bones of soldiers who died at The Little Big Horn.

    If I remember the story correctly the neckless was given to a teacher by a native American school child whose grandfather had fought at the Little Bighorn. I can imaging that old Native American on a restricted reservation, being guarded by 7th Cavalry soldiers proudly wearing that strange neckless and wearing a smile.
    TOLERANCE is the virtue of a man without convictions.

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