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  1. #11
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    835
    I have three that I like to use. All in .308. In each instance, I bought the rifle, not the caliber. I only have to reload one chambering and it works.

  2. #12
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    1,106
    I made a similar decision on handguns. Simplifies the reloading room a good bit.
    Bore, n. ; everybody else's synonym for "shotgun enthusiast."

  3. #13
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Lewiston, Idaho
    Posts
    1,641
    Expanding the discussion to all firearms and simplifying really takes the fun out of life.
    A 30-06 bolt action, a 12 gauge pump and a 38 Sp revolver will solve any North American firearms requirement but lead one to a very dreary life.

  4. #14
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Where ruffed grouse were.
    Posts
    1,317
    Dreary or not may be best defined by the use of the equipment rather than by the number or variety of the equipment chosen.
    The equipment chosen appears to me much as do the raisens in porridge....nice but not as filling.

    No interest in shooting an elk or, especially, a bear but I have owned 06s, .270s and up to a .375 H&H and as far down as one can almost go and can not imagine either of the OP noted calibers to be found wanting for either listed critter with a proper bullet properly placed at a proper distance.

    I reduced to only a .257 Bob a few years ago and feel no loss....don't really need it....simply nice to have, for now.
    Starting over, I would go with a 7X57 for larger game.....and hope to be able to choose it wrapped up in a Rigby with express sights.
    "A Dog, a Gun and Time Enough" GBE......I would only add bacon.

  5. #15
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    835
    I can think of a few things in this life that lighten my step and quicken my pulse. Different numbers stamped on the heads of the cartridges in my coat pocket, probably wouldn't make that list.

  6. #16
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Central Oregon
    Posts
    736
    I started as a 12 year old with a model 70 Winchester 270, and have taken most species of N America big game with it. I moved up in caliber for whatever unknown reason to 7mm Remington and 300 Weatherby, and they did exactly the same job as the 270. Since then, I have sold them all except the original 270 I had, and a 270 WSM that I usually use now. It's a short action, is very flat shooting, and adds a little range to the standard 270. I still think the 270 is one of the best cartridges ever built, is more than adequate for any US big game short of grizzlies out to 300 yards plus. Most of the big game cartridges are adequate if the hunter is a decent shot and knows his limitations.

  7. #17
    I came of age reading Jack O'Connor's writings. So it stands to reason that a .270Winchester ended up being the caliber I have used.

    None of the moose or elk that I have shot have gone any distance to speak of after the first shot. Then again, the shots have been where you would want them to be.

    What makes it so good is that it is a caliber that is mild enough recoiling that flinching is not usually a problem. No one can shoot a rifle well if they have a flinch. The flat trajectory makes putting the bullet where you want pretty straight forward. It also packs a considerable punch when it hits an animal. The two moose I have killed have had the bullets resting against the hide on the far side of the rib cage.

    A trend that gives me the creeps is the deliberate long range shooting of big game. I'm not talking 300 to maybe 400 yards. It is the shooting a animals out around 800+ yards that is shown on a few outdoor hunting shows. There is just too much that can go wrong. An animal deserves better than being a long range target.
    Give me a dog that will run and a horse that will walk

  8. #18
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Dover-Foxcroft, ME
    Posts
    995
    I have no specific recommendation. Actually, I think specific recommendations is rude, an arrogance born of assumptions about individuals who have never met.

    Let's start with the floor. There is a floor. .22 CFs are not all conditions whitetail rifles. 6mms (and probably the smaller .25s) are not all conditions elk cartridges. It's probably a mistake to seek out the least powerful cartridge that will kill a particular game animal under most conditions. A much better approach involves seeking out the most powerful cartridge you, the individual, can manage with no decrement in field accuracy to your maximum sensible distance. The cartridge selected should have a sufficiently flat trajectory so to enable hits to that sensible maximum distance, as defined by your skills from field positions.

    Whether this means you have selected a .270, or a .300 Win, or a .378 Weatherby is of no import to anyone else here.

    Next, there is no such thing as overkill. The difference in terms of factual meat damage between those three is minimal unless Texas heart shots are your thing. And if you wish to minimize "bloodshot" meat, simply reduce the animal's blood pressure to zero as quickly as you can. You'll have more "bloodshot" meat with the .22 CFs than with a .300 Win.

    Finally, I have been referring to general purpose cartridges to be used under any reasonable circumstance. These are rifles you'd take with you on a pricey hunt to some remote place where you might have to push your abilities on the last day. I can take a different view with respect to meat animals "behind the house". Here I can afford to pass up a shot on a deer that cannot be ethically taken with a Hornet - or a moose opportunity that is inappropriate for a .250 Savage.

  9. #19
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Georgia, USA
    Posts
    296
    I'm no big game hunter, but I have taken a great many Whitetail deer. I shot a .243 Winchester for many years with Colt rifle built on a Sako Vixen action. Never had any complaints at all about it being enough gun. Still I worried about reports of the .243 falling short, even on deer, so I moved up slightly to a .270 Win. in a Remington 700, then a Ruger #1.

    This year I decided to move back down to the .243 and went with a Browning 1885 Low Wall. It is a lovely little rifle and I put a Zeiss Diavari 2-4.5X scope on it. I have no doubt this one will see me out to the end...SelbyLowndes

  10. #20
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Dakota/ Montana
    Posts
    5,236
    [QUOTE=Dave Noell;87217 An animal deserves better than being a long range target.[/QUOTE]

    So does a game bird.
    B.C.

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