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  1. #11
    The problem, Kirk, is that it's too easy to cripple them on the wing. And no dog to help with your aiming errors. Not that you'd necessarily WANT a dog to try to retrieve a crippled gobbler. Might cause the dog to have second thoughts about retrieving anything!

    Had one experience like that . . . by accident. Was hunting out in western Iowa with a group that included a teenager. We're in the middle of a big CRP field when a gobbler comes lumbering up out of the grass. I yelled at the kid when he started to mount his gun, but I wasn't quick enough. He wing-busted that bird, and my old shorthair took off in pursuit--me taking a couple shots to try to finish it off. They disappear over a hill. When we get there, Heidi's got her front legs pinning the bird down. And looking like : "I've got the darned thing, but someone's going to have to come and get it." None of us had a fall license. Fortunately, the teenager's dad knew someone who did. We left it where he could find it.

  2. #12
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    508
    Not so much when they're trying to fly a semi-circle around your head at 15 yards. I left the dog in the truck, anyhow. I was supposed to be the driver of the turkeys, but turned into the shooter of the turkey.

    OTOH I once had an 11-87 Sporting Clays gun and missed a rooster that flew a similar pattern just a couple yards further away. Missed him with 4 shots, all the gun held. Premium copper plated 6's, the good stuff. My friend Gene didn't laugh, and I don't know why not. I bet Jet laughed, but it was hard to tell. Maybe she frowned. One of the few pheasants I saw in the brush because of his white ring, just before he knew or sensed the camo hadn't worked.

    I think I lifted my head, or would have if I'd gotten down on the stock in the first place.
    Bore, n. ; everybody else's synonym for "shotgun enthusiast."

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by kgb View Post
    ...I once had an 11-87 Sporting Clays gun and missed a rooster that flew a similar pattern just a couple yards further away. Missed him with 4 shots, all the gun held. Premium copper plated 6's, the good stuff....
    A handful of Copper 4s have a good reputation re pheasants......................................... ..................
    Cimino Hardware...a clear choice.

  4. #14
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    SE N.M.
    Posts
    129
    Quote Originally Posted by Junnie View Post
    That's how they hunt in Russia. Some times with a Cow Board or Blind, walk up to the birds a shoot them, they're looking for meat, not sport....
    A cut out of a cow works fairly well on snow geese. I could not help myself. I had to try it. It worked, a little to well.


  5. #15
    Eagle
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Endless Mountains of Pa
    Posts
    3,866
    kgb,
    Here in Pa it has always been ethical to take a Turkey on the wing, most however never get the chance at such a prize. Congrats on your Turkey on the wing shooting.

    Now that Pa has the new laws that allow Turkey hunting with a dog, more and more Turkey hunters are using them to fall Turkey hunt, in a couple different manners. I was lucky enough to own a fantastic Small Munsterlander dog who was an artist at sneaking up on Turkey's and pointing them like he did Grouse. A treasured companion dog for sure.

    As Larry Brown indicated if you plan on using a dog to hunt Turkey, the dog should come from a line that is Bred to play the game, such as a German GVP Tested Versatile dog. These real German dogs are aggression GVP tested for retrieving game, especially crippled birds, and foxes. In fact part of the GVP test is that they must clear a 3 rail fence while doing the retrieve, with the bird or fox in their mouth. These dogs dispatch crippled birds and game and retrieve it to hand immediately. One of my fondest hunting memories is of Sampson my Small Munsterlander setting a nice sized female Turkey, as he did a Grouse. He flushed the big bird on command. I shot the Turkey down with my 16 Gauge L.C. Smith double gun, using the #6's under the 2nd Trigger. The big bird dropped to the ground and Sampson dispatched the bird and retrieved it to hand. That big bird never had a chance, it was dispatched immediately by the Small Munsterlander dog. Watching him prance back to me with that Turkey in his mouth is one of my most treasured of hunting memories.

    Both Sampson my SM and Rosie my German Short Hair were GVP tested Versatile dogs, they both hunt in God's never ending forest now. I wish Rosie could have hunted Pa Turkeys she loved pointing them, however she passed away before the change in the Pa laws allowing it.

    RGD/Dave



    Pine Creek Sampson with his True Double Grouse, taken with a 1913 L.C. Smith 16 Gauge Hammer Gun.

    Last edited by Ryman Gun Dog; April 27th, 2017 at 11:18 AM.
    Never worry about what others believe, walk in the way of the Lord.

  6. #16
    First Class
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    34
    Enjoying Beans' thread.

    Haven't been around these forums in quite some time.
    We recently lost two little Setters in the course of four months. Our little Gordon, Holly on Christmas Day 2016, and Sandy, an English out of Ultimate Reissue X Clarks Sandy Beach, on April 10. We're still hurting, and for the first time in I cannot remember how many years, we are dogless. The silence in the house is deafening!
    They were both past 13, the ES two months shy of 14, and they had full lives, but losing old friends is never easy ..

    Both my knees are shot, a bad hip and sketchy back, but there will be more gundogs, read Setters, in our home, when God sees fit to align the stars for us...

  7. #17
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    192
    The best turkey hunts are when you have the opportunity to track one for a couple of days. They are pretty smart but they have a weakness in that if they are not disturbed they will repeat themselves, taking the same path to water or food that they have before and they are not going over any terrain where they can't see far enough to not get hemmed in and they can get horny stupid. So they can be ambushed.

    There was one turkey I really got to liking. I was tracking him and he spotted me so ducked down in creek bed that I thought would let me get behind him. I'm headed down the creek when I heard a gobble ahead of me. I figured there was no way he was going to get stuck in that creek where he couldn't see. He was going to double back and take his brood up and over a hill behind me. I doubled back there he was taking his brood over the hill. He sure knew how to use terrain. Some how he had managed to get a Jake down in the creek bed to gobble to throw me off. Next morning I took three Jakes out of his brood. Jakes cook up better then a tough old long beard so I'm not big on beards.

    Next weekend a couple of friends wanted me to help them get a turkey. I spotted what I thought was a good roost and set them up in front while I took the back door. Damned if I didn't stumble on to that cagey old gobbler. To me the challenge of turkey hunting is out smarting a smart old bird. Running into him by accident didn't give me the right to shoot him, and besides we needed to keep a smart turkey like him in the gene pool. He took off and in my minds eye, I get a kick out of watching him fly off to this day.

    I enjoyed turkey hunting. They can be pretty smart. Smarter then most the guys trying to shoot them. However they can be predictable and that's their weakness.
    Last edited by pooch; June 2nd, 2017 at 03:57 PM.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  8. #18
    Eagle
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Endless Mountains of Pa
    Posts
    3,866
    Setterman222,
    Real sorry about your dog loss, we are going thru a similar situation here. Lost both Ripper our Gordon male and Sampson our Small Munsterlander male on the same day not to long ago. Even with 4 other gun dogs, there is an incredible silence in our home. Ripper was 14 and Sampson was 18, both had long great lives. I have incredible memories of great gun dogs because of them both.

    Hope you heal up soon and decide to acquire a new pup.

    RGD/Dave
    Never worry about what others believe, walk in the way of the Lord.

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