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Thread: Quail Video

  1. #11
    Eagle Crazy Horse 7/3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Junnie View Post
    One of the major reasons I dislike the dog flushing: You blow the top of the dogs head off.
    From what I've experienced with shooting Quail they seem to fly somewhat low compared to Pheasants or Grouse when flushed. That being the case, one simply has to let the bird go. That is unless you're so very hungry for a shot as to put your dog in jeopardy.
    TOLERANCE is the virtue of a man without convictions.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Junnie View Post
    One of the major reasons I dislike the dog flushing: You blow the top of the dogs head off.
    I've hunted preserve quail numerous times. The guide always warns about taking low shots, typically warning that if one pellet touches a dog, the hunter pays $2,500. Period.

    I have never seen a dog shot.

    I will say that once or twice in the quail video, a shot looked a little low to me. But, the gun was shooting over his own dogs, and my view was not his view. Plainly, he felt he was taking a safe shot.

  3. #13
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    Wild quail ordinarily go out low on a covey rise. Dogs which leap up trying to catch a bird are the ones that get shot. That said, I've never come close to shooting an overly enthusiastic bird-dog. I usually hunt over my own dogs and I know which ones to look out for. When hunting over other's dogs, the owners/handlers recognize the problem and will caution about which dogs to watch out for...SelbyLowndes

    Still and always the choice to shoot is with the gun handler and the blame for a mishap is as well!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Junnie View Post
    I'm curious as to why the shooter lets the dogs flush the birds?
    Along the same lines, I'm curious as to why the gun is shooting practically AT the dogs. I would never shoot that close to my dog... ever.

  5. #15
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    I have to agree with both of you, that I was very surprised to see how close it appeared the hunter was to shooting near the dog.

    But, with the camera mounted on his head, and our not being there to see the angles, etc., I don't think we should make a judgement.

  6. #16
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    I grew up hunting wild Georgia bobs, still get to flush a covey of wild ones occasionally. I also am invited to hunt on a neighboring tract of private land that is managed for quail, and on which 1600 flight trained birds (25 coveys) are released each August. I can assure you that, by January-February the released birds fly every bit as fast and well as wild birds. Main difference I see is that a true wild covey will not hold for the dogs as well, most of the time. There are exceptions to that, meaning that at times a covey that was released 6 months earlier will not hold either, and there are times that a wild covey will.

    SRH

  7. #17
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    Hunting Northern Bob White well over sixty years, without a doubt my favorite upland game bird. We seldom flushed birds in the open as depicted in video, I suppose SOP in Kansas.

    I've hunted with the same three fellows well over fifty years all are or were AA shooters, on average we kill about 50% shots taken. Reason: The reacted flight of bird, especially if trees, shrubs tall growth grass anything for the birds protection. That is the reason we all enjoyed hunting Bob White birds. Grand sport.

    We've always been lucky and had quality bird dogs some were bird finding machines, never the less still about 50% kill ratio, shots taken. We never ever had the dog flush, period in over sixty years of quail hunting.

    Purpose of pointing dogs: hunt and point given birds, the shooters job to make the flush and kill.

    IMHO..... Thank you in advance: Junnie

    Once you start letting the dog point and flush, he'll eventually start creeping in and flush on his own command, not good.
    "Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper."

  8. #18
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    Junnie, another take on this. At one very well run operation in my opinion, based on shooting at a number of preserves, specifically Deer Creek, Sebree, KY, a place that attracts hunters from all over, they use pointers, typically two, to locate the birds. Then, they send in a Lab to flush them.
    All of the dogs retrieve.
    Just another way to do it.
    DC has a no limit quail hunt, which can be very exciting.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Moonshine View Post
    Good to hear.

    In my preserve experience, birds are typically put out no later than August, at least 60 days before hunting begins.
    Moonshine, the good preserves do indeed use early release birds. And may even have some wild birds when survivors make it through the winter and breed in the spring. The places that have the most problems are those preserves--certainly a majority of them--that put out quail immediately before the hunters hit the field.

    But an early release in August will not carry a preserve through an entire hunting season. They need to continue releasing birds. The good ones have plenty of land, and will rotate fields being hunted so that the birds that have been released during the hunting season aren't hunted until they've been out for some time. A single early release in August might provide good hunting through November or so (depending on how many birds are released, how manyt hunters are allowed to take, and on predation), but will not support hunting into late winter, which is the length of the preserve season most places. The big pheasant lodges in SD, where they essentially "farm for pheasants" and get a lot of natural reproduction, similarly have to supplement with released roosters throughout the season. In both cases, if they do it right, that still guarantees good quality birds--whether they were born in the wild, released before the season, or released 2 or 3 weeks before you hunt them. Very different from the places that release the day of the hunt. (And you pay for the difference.)

  10. #20
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    Larry,
    What you say is absolutely true, supplementing is the way most of these business keep their businesses running thru out the entire year. Having helped to run a non commercial regulated shooting grounds it was always easier to use the active open air pen raised Pheasants than to manage a good Flying Quail population. A well managed Quail population takes time and money to propagate, and predator control is a definite must. I have the utmost respect for places who have a well managed Quail population that flies well. However I still love to gun the wild Texas Quail best for Bob Whites, and Mearns Quail in AZ is still top Quail gunning!
    RGD/Dave
    Never worry about what others believe, walk in the way of the Lord.

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