Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Burke Co., GA
    Posts
    525
    Of course no gun is built to perfection, but is that lack of perfection why we buy second guns ....... because the first one we ever buy breaks or wears out? Hardly.

    SRH

  2. #22
    Eagle Crazy Horse 7/3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    S.E. PA.
    Posts
    1,146
    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Hillis View Post
    That is about as narrow minded a statement as I have read lately.

    SRH
    Hey Stan, wake up to reality! ;~)
    TOLERANCE is the virtue of a man without convictions.

  3. #23
    It's just history.
    The history of an expanding nation, and a company filling a need with a product positioned to sell in volume.

    Avg wage in 1900 about $400/year, or, 8$/wk
    LC Smith sidelock (80% of production in the field grade, ie. low end) was $50.00 w/ ejectors in 1900.
    1904? They introduce a box lock to compete with Euro junk, for like $15.00.
    1913 they revamp the whole line to stay in business, and then carry on for another 40 years.

    And they finish with 80% of their product sold at the low end.

    You would think that over their 60 year production run, these abominations would either have disappeared from the market, or replaced by a better item. I can't speak for anywhere else, but where I live, LC's are quite popular, hundreds are in service regularly, and quite a few in regular use are over 100 years old. With a huge installed base.

    That so many are still around, and so few of other medium volume brands, hints that maybe they aren't the junk that the link suggests.
    I wouldn't expect a pump to operate for 100 years without wear or need of repair. Nor an old engine. Or a house fan. So, if over time a shotgun requires attention doesn't surprise me.

    So, I guess you just have to take the initial comments with a big grain of salt.

    But I bet he'll work on your Smith if you ask nice.
    "Chemists make good solutions"

  4. #24
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    1,846
    If Vicnair's comments were the root of this yet again dustup then ducks poop marshmallows.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by thornton View Post
    If Vicnair's comments were the root of this yet again dustup then ducks poop marshmallows.
    Actually Thornton, my only objection from beginning to end, was the use of Vicknair's pompousity to stab Dave Buehner in the eye for fun.

    I had hoped that school yard stuff had left this board two-three software iterations ago.
    And I wouldn't know who Dave Buehner was if he was standing on my doorstep with Adam.
    "Chemists make good solutions"

  6. #26
    Eagle
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Endless Mountains of Pa
    Posts
    3,979
    Greg T,
    I do appreciate that you are a decent man and actually looked at the over all picture of what was actually happening in this thread, and reacted to it in a positive manner befriending me. Every member of the SSBB knows my opinions on L.C. Smith guns, many now even know our family connection to the Hunter Arms Businesses. I am not just Bias, our family invested long ago in what we actually believe, and still do.

    Gun Smith's with small businesses like this gentlemen come and go in every generation, with their opinions on many different weapons, including Hunter Arms/ L.C. Smith Shotguns, all are welcome to their opinions. L.C. Smith Guns have stood the test of time thru the generations, they speak for themselves.

    IMO, along with Master Gun Maker Freddie Brunner, L.C. Smith Man Walt Schiessl, Weapon's Historian William S. Brophy, Master Gun Maker Nick Makinson and many many others, John Houchin's said it perfectly - L.C. Smith America's Best.

    RGD/Dave


    L.C. Smith - The Legend Lives - John Houchins

    Annies's L.C. Smith Double Guns on Display in the Cody Museum.

    Never worry about what others believe, walk in the way of the Lord.

  7. #27
    Eagle Crazy Horse 7/3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    S.E. PA.
    Posts
    1,146
    We should keep in mind that opinions are much like .......noses; everyone has one, and they often stick them in places they shouldn't.

    All to often folks note that "Best guns" are literally hand made; skilled men spending untold hours hand making and fitting these fine double guns.

    If the truth be told, today's CNC machines (Some 5 axis machines.) can and do produce some of the finest guns ever made. Did I forget to mention that they don't cost a years wages and more?

    I gotta wonder why Olympic champions don't shoot "Best" shotguns. Surely nothing but the "Best" would be at the Olympic firing line.

    L.C. Smith shotguns may not be the very best shotguns ever made, but my money says a hell of a lot more game was felled by Smiths than ever by "Best" guns.
    TOLERANCE is the virtue of a man without convictions.

  8. #28
    I am constantly reminded that "time is money."
    If you are running a factiory making complex things with dozens of parts, processes, and fittings,
    the enemy of making a profit is attempting to find perfection.

    Every mechanical device is a compromise.

    If the known deficiencies are easily accommodated decades later by modern processes, why be so harsh?
    "Chemists make good solutions"

  9. #29
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Way south of the Ohio River...
    Posts
    1,158
    CNC machines, in the world of very high quality shotguns, are nothing more than highly technical and complicated replacement donkey labor. Purely labor-saving tools.

    Such gunmanufacturers as use them rarely, if ever, use a component directly off the CNC, without further hand-finishing, as another few thousandths are filed, scraped, or sanded off.

    From Donald Dallas's books, one learns that such tools can reduce the time to finish a lock from as much as 3 weeks to 3-4 days. But, there's still the hand-finishing and fitting that creates the gun for the buyer.

    The "best" manufacturers add quality via the choices of steels and design modifications, seldom finding added quality in the rough, CNC, machining process.

    Big time shooters are frequently subsidized by manufacturers to promote their products. If business management, sales, and production already keep a shop busy, subsidization isn't necessary.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •