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  1. #21
    I've been practicing for driven grouse for a couple years now. It's hard to simulate in my area. Training for Driven pheasant was easier.It's sort of downhill, reverse wobble trap. You have a ready position, a bracketed set of angles, and a downhill, flurry of fast birds incoming from 6 different traps. First bird at 40-50, 2nd at 25-35, 3rd outbound at 20 (after a safe turn),and the 4th outbound at 40. It's hard to do. You need a slope to add gravity to the clay's flight for longer flight time and good speed. The mount is sort of a half-mount with a push ahead. Mount on their feet, and pull /push ahead.. Whereas long driven birds are like pass shooting geese. Mount on their tail, match line and speed, push ahead until you see enough daylight, and shoot. They are opposite forms.
    "Chemists make good solutions"

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Greg T. View Post
    I believe he shoots a Perazzi MX2000.Larry, What constitutes a "Sporting bird" is an entirely individual matter.A poor shot might say 20 yards, and an expert 50.With grouse it isn't so much a distance thing as a shooting flying thing.
    Well . . . 20 yards would clear the tops of fairly tall trees. Certainly sporting if one at that height appears in a short window. 50 . . . that's for the specialists in high pheasants. Most people shooting "normal" driven birds aren't even equipped for a 50 yard shot. Wrong gun, wrong chokes, wrong load. As Chris Batha (a pretty fair shot himself) pointed out in an article on high birds in Shooting Sportsman: A 40 yard shot is one most driven shooters should be proud of making. (And one that most can't make consistently.)

  3. #23
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    ethics

    Quote Originally Posted by sd/mt pga pro View Post
    That sort of sounds like if you prefer blondes it must be a clue to something superior. There might be some very real reasons for his choice. More familar, sponsor monies, gifted, high volume shooting, ET AL. None of which is evident in the video.
    what an azole ! How many birds did he take home to - pluck, gut, cook and eat? This was no more than "target practice" on a sentient WILD creature - NOT a reared/released bit of cannon fodder for the trigger happy ****s who emerge from London to ' extoll " their talents(?).sorry - no emoji for vomit....

  4. #24
    Well Harkom88 on the surface I can see your point but consider if people didn't like to shoot and eat them estate owners wouldn't employee game keepers , helpers etc and spend big bucks burning the heather to maximize reproduction so that probably w/o the gunning there'd be fewer birds than with the gunning.

  5. #25
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    One's feelings of "superior ethics" are not shared by all, and cannot be forced upon others. And perhaps they are "superior" in that person's mind alone.

  6. #26
    Eagle
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    Greg, for those who can, many British shooting schools offer driven grouse practice butts.Harkom, grouse are reared for shooting and subsequent eating. If the rearing were not done at great cost, few of those grouse would ever have hatched, much less lived to maturity, nor would there have been guns to shoot them. Go cuddle chickens.

  7. #27
    Eagle
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    I bothers me also to see this sort of wholesale slaughter. It's curious but when you hunt you develop a kinship with the animal you have set out to kill.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  8. #28
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    These birds are raised as a farm crop. Do you object to chicken or turkey farming for food? The British birds are not penned up, but lead a much more normal life than market raised fowls you buy at the supermarket, and nowhere near all of them are shot. Just because different cultural practices occur does not make them evil or wrong.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moonshine View Post
    Greg, for those who can, many British shooting schools offer driven grouse practice butts.Harkom, grouse are reared for shooting and subsequent eating. If the rearing were not done at great cost, few of those grouse would ever have hatched, much less lived to maturity, nor would there have been guns to shoot them. Go cuddle chickens.
    fyi Red Grouse are not "reared". Their habitat is managed to optimise survival rates of their natural breeding cycle - hence good years and bad years - depending on weather patterns and disease. please , know what your talking about before making contradictory statements aks bs.

  10. #30
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    Of course. In my lexicon, burning and managing heather as a food and protective crop, keeping vermin and predators to a minimum, and putting out medicated grit are all deliberately performed parts of a program solely intended to help grouse survive. In that sense, these are deliberate actions taken to produce a crop of saleable birds, hence a form of rearing. Without the help of the property owners doing these things, far fewer grouse would survive. Rather than assuming my ignorance and writing about your mistaken assumptions on my awareness in a snide manner, you would show some attributes of sophisticated curiosity by asking me what I meant by rearing.

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