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  1. #41
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    759
    I had to grow up fighting even thought I might do it for money, which was a dumb idea. I like getting in the ring but I'm a lousy fighter, not mentally or physically tough enough. In my heart of hearts I'm a wimp. I like dishes with flowers on them, I drink tea, I like to sew, like animals and trees, don't like violence; girly stuff.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  2. #42
    First Class
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    4

    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Moonshine View Post
    Of course. In my lexicon, burning and managing heather as a food and protective crop, keeping vermin and predators to a minimum, and putting out medicated grit are all deliberately performed parts of a program solely intended to help grouse survive. In that sense, these are deliberate actions taken to produce a crop of saleable birds, hence a form of rearing. Without the help of the property owners doing these things, far fewer grouse would survive. Rather than assuming my ignorance and writing about your mistaken assumptions on my awareness in a snide manner, you would show some attributes of sophisticated curiosity by asking me what I meant by rearing.
    i apologise if you thought i was being snide, but once again you demonstrate your shortcomings in knowledge of upland management - heather burning is not solely aimed at optimising grouse production: grouse shooting is not a programme deliberately designed to "produce a crop of saleable birds". Historically (since the "Clearances" )these regions have been stock rearing (sheep) areas- which required muirburn to get rid of old, woody, non-nutritious heather for new growth which the stock could utilise for production. Burning also helped -1. heather regeneration - new growth of nutritious use 2. kill off ticks (carrier of looping-ill virus) et al. The Grouse shooting industry ensued as another revenue for the landowners. I am happy to engage in dialogue/debate with anybody who has some understanding of the topic - but to quote a gamekeeper friend who was accused of being unsociable -" I can't be bothered arguing with idiots".

  3. #43
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Way south of the Ohio River...
    Posts
    1,291
    Nor can I. Nit-picking, like question-and-answer, is not a form of civilized conversation.
    Last edited by Moonshine; Yesterday at 07:48 AM.

  4. #44
    In answer to the OPs question...No, no I do not. As to artfully created or high volume shooting activities involving gmebirds, kinda like shooting a bear...I dont see the appeal but bear lard makes good pie crust.
    Do not forget pumpkin!

  5. #45
    Thornton, the first time I shot driven birds, I wasn't sure if I'd like it. Found it interesting and enjoyable. And of course there's the whole tradition that's grown up around it in the UK and some places on the continent. It's not hunting in the sense we mean it, but in the case of pheasants, there's some similarity to a large group strategically positioning blockers. One important difference there is that the beaters aren't armed on a driven shoot, which means that only the guns, playing the role of "blockers", need to worry about safe shots.

    A high school friend's father got peppered in the face in one of those situations. Fortunately missed his eyes.

  6. #46
    As an American that does not wish to be insulting or mis-understood, Driven game shooting is shooting, not "hunting" as understood in the US and other places. I can't say more than that. A person will either admire Simon'e level of accuracy, or they won't. I might aspire and train to perhaps shoot that well someday, but I understand that others have no interest in it. Observe it, or not, for what it is.
    "Chemists make good solutions"

  7. #47
    Larry, the tradition would appeal and even the garb holds an appeal as well as showing respect, for me. I never pheasant hunt tho with a large group of hunters and, strategy normally eludes me much like a modeling gig with Mens Warehouse. I cope and am sitting waiting for a KS sunrise as I type. Kilt two pheasants wehn my Emerson was paws down yesterday...I will plan a startegy today of the sort best identified as....appreciating being here.
    Do not forget pumpkin!

  8. #48
    Thornton, I also avoid large groups. But that doesn't mean that the strategies they employ won't end up with birds in the bag that might otherwise escape. A bunch of pheasants in a cattail-choked pothole late in the season, when snow and cold have made good cover scarce . . . I might try to place my lone partner strategically as I approach the cover with my dog. But if it's a very big pocket of cattails, he can only cover what we assume is the most likely exit point. And given the wariness of late season birds and their tendency to depart en masse, or nearly so, it's nice to try and take advantage of limited opportunities. Surrounding it, if you have a large enough group . . . that's a bit like driven birds for the blockers.

    But depending on the cover in question, even one blocker can work well. I remember a hunt with two friends, one of whom had not yet filled his Iowa deer tag. He'd loaded 6's in the chamber of his pump followed by slugs. He figured if we saw a deer, he'd jack out the bird shot and take a chance at the deer. And for obvious reasons, he often played the role of blocker that day. The two of us with dogs worked a narrow waterway, heading his way where he waited for us where waterway met gravel road. Dogs were getting birdy and acting like the birds were running. They were. Two of them jumped, offering our blocker an excellent chance. He dropped the first. Then he dropped the second . . . almost cutting it in half with a slug. He didn't get his deer that day, but he did make a shot he'll never forget.

  9. #49
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    759
    That's why I say I'm no pheasant hunter. I've only had success when I hunted with several people where we used walkers and blockers. I've never had success when there were just two of us or I was alone.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

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