Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 57
  1. #41
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    San Diego, California
    Posts
    177
    No one has yet mentioned that there is a stable pheasant population in the California Imperial Valley and a very good pheasant population immediately south of the border (where the farming practices are less intense). It gets really hot out there so pheasants can clearly tolerate tempertures way over 100F.
    Pete Houser

  2. #42
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    759
    That is interesting!! I was convinced that the pheasant was a cold weather bird and us good ol' boys were out of luck. I been in the Imperial Valley and on the Mexican border. It's hot.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  3. #43
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Central Oregon
    Posts
    227
    Maybe shooting pen raised chukar feels like shooting chickens, but I assure you that has no comparison to wild chukar. Anyone that hits wild birds regularly I consider a very good shot. I would agree with Dave that huns and chukar are excellent birds for pointing dogs. I've also found quail in the SW to be great for pointing dogs. While I hunt pheasant a lot, including eastern Mt., I'm not sure they do my setters any good.

  4. #44
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    SE N.M.
    Posts
    164
    Years ago there were ditch parrots in SE Arizona around Fort Grant. Released and held on for a few years. Friends that live in that area occasionally hear rumors someone sees one. Ive got a smattering of ditch parrots here in NM. Afghans I think, about a hundred miles due north of me around Clovis NM. Not a lot, but enough to have a three day season on them. I go each year and shoot a limit on one farm with two half sections of CRP, and that's it for ditch parrots for me. Farmer and his son hunt with me, I did him a favor (quick easy repair) on a livestock scale inspection, saving him some money and he invited me in his words to "blast some ditch chickens". That has become an annual event. I have more fun with the occasional point on Lesser Prairie Chickens about 40 miles north of me. When I get off my horse to flush in that area, it can be bobs, blues or LPCS. Found two small coveys of them last weekend. I don't hunt that area much, oak shinnery is hard on a horses legs, I have to leg wrap to hunt it. I need at least two more dogs and one more horse to get serious about it.


  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by pooch View Post
    That is interesting!! I was convinced that the pheasant was a cold weather bird and us good ol' boys were out of luck. I been in the Imperial Valley and on the Mexican border. It's hot.
    But not very humid.

  6. #46
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    759
    I was asked to do a "clean up" of a bunch pen raised birds, two or three Chuckers were in the batch. I was using a 20 ga. the Chuckers seemed a pretty tough bird. That coupled with the hills I would think hunting the wild ones would be be a challenge. I have a feeling that the pheasants found in the Imperial Valley and on the Mexican border were released birds that went feral. I've flown out of Yuma some and have to put water on the controls to cool them enough to touch them. I can't see a pheasant surviving in an environment like that.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  7. #47
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln Nebraska
    Posts
    3,012
    "Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper."

  8. #48
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Fairport NY
    Posts
    239
    Sounds like we too often forget that ALL U.S. pheasants started out from "released" birds!

  9. #49
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Dakota/ Montana
    Posts
    2,875
    Quote Originally Posted by BobK34 View Post
    Sounds like we too often forget that ALL U.S. pheasants started out from "released" birds!
    Yes! But any and all born in the wild are wild birds. All those born 3/4 of a century after that first release are as different from released poultry as Cape Buffalo are from Jersey cows!

    It appears Big George made it through to yesterday. If the bird I watched is him, He is now at least 18 months old. That for a pheasant is old......really old! I think it is him because of his unusually large size and terrible, long spurs, which I could see so clearly with the Swarovskis.

    I watched him work his way from my alfalfa, across my front lawn, hugging the nesting cover I planted between the road and the lawn.

    One step low crawl, plaster down right to the ground, head swilfle and then repeat. It took him more than a half hour to cross the yard to gain the safety of my shelter belt.

    There could be no doubt that he was a wild bird and a practiced master of survival!
    Last edited by sd/mt pga pro; December 8th, 2017 at 11:48 AM.
    B.C.

  10. #50
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    759
    I'm used to quail who are pretty puny and every one wants to eat them. I think pheasants are pretty neat, pretty as hell and a lot faster then they look. I've shot behind more pheasants then I like to admit. I was hunting pheasant alone (didn't work) and I saw this big hawk circling an area. I thought there are pheasants down there drawing this big hawk, I don't think it was a Red Tail but nearly as big as a Red Tail. Suddenly a rooster does a loop in the air and on his back tries to spur this hawk and the hawk flies off. I thought that is one heck of a bird.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •