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  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by sd/mt pga pro View Post
    Yes! But any and all born in the wild are wild birds. All those born 3/4 of a century after that first release are as different from released poultry as Cape Buffalo are from Jersey cows!

    It appears Big George made it through to yesterday. If the bird I watched is him, He is now at least 18 months old. That for a pheasant is old......really old! I think it is him because of his unusually large size and terrible, long spurs, which I could see so clearly with the Swarovskis.

    I watched him work his way from my alfalfa, across my front lawn, hugging the nesting cover I planted between the road and the lawn.

    One step low crawl, plaster down right to the ground, head swilfle and then repeat. It took him more than a half hour to cross the yard to gain the safety of my shelter belt.

    There could be no doubt that he was a wild bird and a practiced master of survival!
    So almost through his 2nd season, Bob. If he makes it to next season, that's really beating the odds for a rooster pheasant. I pity the young studs who try to crowd in on his harem in a few months!

  2. #52
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Dakota/ Montana
    Posts
    2,875
    He may be older than that, Larry. I am certain the bird I have watched on several occasions the last month or so, is the brute I put photos of up last January. The odds of two that large and with spurs so long they are readily visible when he walks are too long.

    I fight the temptation to bushwack him. Somehow it just doesn't seem fair for me to shorten the old brute's life with something he can't out smart...powder and shot.
    B.C.

  3. #53
    We usually interpret long, sharp, black spurs as an indicator of a bird that's into his second season, and that indicator is almost always accurate. But I recall one of the biggest birds I can remember shooting . . . his legs were yellow like a chicken, rather than the typical pheasant gray. And had only little bumps where spurs would normally be found.

    Bob, have you ever shot an albino?

  4. #54
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    South Dakota/ Montana
    Posts
    2,875
    No, but I shot what out here we call a piebald. A bird with a tremendous amount of white coloring around the head and neck. That is a coloring sometimes seen on a horse, usually accompanied by a blue, or glass eye.

    I saw that old bird again late yesterday. He was with two other roosters and they looked puny next to the old guy.
    B.C.

  5. #55
    I also shot a couple of those piebald birds. One of them was in an area that seemed to have more than its share of odd-looking pheasants, including the occasional albino. Sometimes happens near a preserve because they've released pheasants other than ringnecks, and occasionally one will survive to breed. But there weren't any preserves in that particular area. And the oddest looking one I ever shot (had white wings) came off a farm I still hunt, where I've probably killed more roosters than any other piece of private ground I've ever hunted. Showed it to the farmer and asked him if he'd ever seen any odd-looking pheasants. Said he hadn't. Killed that bird back when I was guiding. I would not have known it was a rooster except it gave me a good crossing profile and I saw the red eye patch. I yelled for my guys to shoot but they didn't, so I did.

  6. #56
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Dallas, Tx
    Posts
    759
    Were you hunting in Ukraine, around Chernobyl?
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  7. #57
    Eagle
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lincoln Nebraska
    Posts
    3,012
    I've shot pheasants of all kinds... most striking,,,, Kansas Greenbacks.... usually escapes from preserves,,,, crossbred with wild birds, beautiful birds... I should of had several mounted.....
    "Education is the ability to listen to almost anything without losing your temper."

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