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Thread: Overloaded 28g

  1. #251
    Eagle
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    Wow! I spend a couple of days in the calving sheds and well, wow!
    B.C.

  2. #252
    Eagle
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    "Just a poor excuse for a hunter." Preserve birds aren't really hunting.

  3. #253
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    Since I'm spoiled by hunting wild birds I'm no fan of the preserve hunt, but I think we had better quit turning up our nose at the preserve because the opportunities to hunt wild birds is getting fewer and fewer.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  4. #254
    Quote Originally Posted by 3 Shots are Better View Post
    Larry,A couple of thots: 1). 3 inch 28 gauge LEAD loads have been available in Europe for years now. We just haven't seen them. However, Fiocchi is starting to important such a load into the U.S. 2). Federal is currently making a 2 3/4 inch 28 gauge STEEL 5/8 oz. load with size 6 and 7 pellets. They will work on doves, but are slow, as well as restrictive. The 6s are reported to be good on pheasants to about 20 yards. Hardly usual 28 gauge ballistics. They need more speed and more pellets to be effective in the usual 28 gauge range.3). Dove are the next in line to be non-toxic shot only, and remember, they are a migratory bird.
    Gary: Doves are indeed migratory. And there MAY be some issues with doves ingesting spent lead shot, especially on areas where they're heavily hunted. (They're obviously more like waterfowl in that respect, with heavy shot fall in some places, than they are like other upland birds.) That's why I don't have any particular issue with Wisconsin's nontox restriction for doves on state wildlife areas. But I don't see them becoming nontox only nationwide, like waterfowl, any time soon. Pretty sure the current administration would not buy off on that.

    Per Tom's SSM article, of the two Fiocchi 3" 28ga lead offerings, one is only an ounce. Can't see much of a big deal there since we already have 1 ounce lead loads . . . and I recently bought a box of 1 oz 8's in Cabela's Herters line of 28ga shells. The other one is 1 1/16 oz. If we're talking something for pheasants, that would add an additional 14 6's. I'm underwhelmed. And when they start putting steel in those 3" hulls, will they be able to get any more than 7/8 or maybe 15/16 oz? And given that Tom says: "I have yet to find any 28ga LEAD load reliably effective on pheasants at distances beyond 35 yards . . . " (emphasis mine), then it looks unlikely to me that a steel load of less than an ounce will give a shooter an effective load beyond 30 yards. While that's fine on preserve pheasants where shots are closer and birds are less tenacious (and where I had very good luck with 3/4 oz lead 7's), I'd hate to restrict myself that much on wild roosters given today's lower bird numbers.

  5. #255
    I can accept being an incidental predator of a wild thing that has lived and survived such predation for eons. I do have a philosophical revulsion to "The only reason for your existence is to amuse me via your death" I'd choose to hang up the guns.

  6. #256
    Quote Originally Posted by thornton View Post
    I greatly enjoyed the Loess Hills of Iowa....wonderful place. At times, a few huns were found along with the pheasant and shy quail.
    Super people lived there and, not to forget the fine eateries of Danish best.

    Unlimited shoots are sad, to me.
    Thornton, I enjoyed them more when I was younger and not hunting on a rebuilt ankle. That's the most athletic pheasant hunting I've ever done. I remember when 3 of us did opening day on a Loess Hills farm that belonged to my partner's in-laws. We had 8 birds. The young guy of the trio suggested maybe we should try for the last one. We older guys outvoted him. Also enjoyed the last really good wild quail hunting I've had in Iowa in the Loess Hills. I never thought southern Iowa, where I'd mostly hunted them before, was particularly flat. But it is compared to the Loess Hills.

  7. #257
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ducky's Dad View Post
    ...Preserve birds aren't really hunting.
    Preserves do not pretend to be, in possibly other than advertising or under a loose definition of hunting.

    Preserves serve a fine purpose for several segments of folks....glad they are around.

    For me tho, shooting stuff in volume is the purpose of clays....its just that a pile of clays on a tailgate makes a lousy photo-op.

  8. #258
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    You expressed my thoughts on hunting, preserves and clays.
    I've done few of the things I said I'd do and about all of the things I said I wouldn't

  9. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Brown View Post
    Thornton, I enjoyed them more when I was younger and not hunting on a rebuilt ankle. That's the most athletic pheasant hunting I've ever done. I remember when 3 of us did opening day on a Loess Hills farm that belonged to my partner's in-laws. We had 8 birds. The young guy of the trio suggested maybe we should try for the last one. We older guys outvoted him. Also enjoyed the last really good wild quail hunting I've had in Iowa in the Loess Hills. I never thought southern Iowa, where I'd mostly hunted them before, was particularly flat. But it is compared to the Loess Hills.
    I suspect I was more to the eastern edge of the hills but it was far from flat.
    I remember a farmer friend terming some soil in that general area as tiger sh itt, never understood where that description came from but it presented some manner of issues.

    The deep narrow watwerways were the real ankle kickers, for me, when the dogs preferred sniffing in the switch.

  10. #260
    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Brown View Post
    Can't see much of a big deal there since we already have 1 ounce lead loads . . . and I recently bought a box of 1 oz 8's in Cabela's Herters line of 28ga shells. The other one is 1 1/16 oz. If we're talking something for pheasants, that would add an additional 14 6's. I'm underwhelmed. And when they start putting steel in those 3" hulls, will they be able to get any more than 7/8 or maybe 15/16 oz? And given that Tom says: "I have yet to find any 28ga LEAD load reliably effective on pheasants at distances beyond 35 yards . . . " (emphasis mine), then it looks unlikely to me that a steel load of less than an ounce will give a shooter an effective load beyond 30 yards. While that's fine on preserve pheasants where shots are closer and birds are less tenacious (and where I had very good luck with 3/4 oz lead 7's), I'd hate to restrict myself that much on wild roosters given today's lower bird numbers.
    Larry: First and foremost, I think you've made a huge step in understanding hunting California pheasants, where low bird numbers and low hunter days are important factors. All of the many posts you made over the years about the ills of me shooting at 40 yards look pretty silly now (well, they did back then as well....)Also, I have shot a lot of steel over the years, and under 30/35 yards, there's little if any difference between steel and lead. Some guys even like steel better for close in shooting. Especially those who duck hunt a lot and use it. I honestly don't see what you have against 3" 28 gauge shells. No one is going to force you to use them, and if it let's others who want more from their 28 gauges when forced to use steel (or even when using lead), what's really wrong with that?

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